ME 495 COURSE PROFILE
DEGREE PROGRAM: Mechanical Engineering

COURSE NUMBER: ME 495 COURSE TITLE: Laboratory II
REQUIRED COURSE OR ELECTIVE COURSE: Required TERMS OFFERED: Fall, Winter
TEXTBOOK / REQUIRED MATERIAL: PRE / CO-REQUISITES: MECHENG 360, MECHENG 395, preceded or accompanied by MECHENG 335 and MECHENG 350. May not elect MECHENG 450 concurrently. Not open to graduate students. I, II (4 credits)
COGNIZANT FACULTY: B. Gillespie
COURSE TOPICS:
  1. Frequency Response Analysis of a Flexible Torsional System
  2. Choose either a or b: (a) Evaluation of a Vapor/Compression Cycle; (b) Dynamic Compensation of a Subwoofer Speaker System
  3. Choose either a, b, or c: (a) Performance of a Single Cylinder Engine; (b) Injection Molding of Plastic Parts; (c) Evaluation of the Welding Process
  4. Student Designed Laboratory
BULLETIN DESCRIPTION: Weekly lectures and extended experimental projects designed to demonstrate experimental and analytical methods as applied to complex mechanical systems. Topics will include controls, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, mechanics, materials, and dynamical systems. Emphasis on laboratory report writing, oral presentations, and team-building skills, and the design of experiments.
COURSE STRUCTURE/SCHEDULE: Lecture: 2 days per week at 1.5 hours, Laboratory: 1 day per week at 3.0 hours

COURSE OBJECTIVES:
for each course objective, links to the Program Outcomes are identified in brackets.

  1. To teach students to analyze complex engineering systems. [1, 2, 11]
  2. To provide students with practical illustration of concepts taught in the core classes. [1]
  3. To teach students how to propose and execute an experimental and analytical program. [2,3]
  4. To teach students to present results in different scientific and industrial written formats. [7]
  5. To teach students to present their results orally. [7]
  6. To teach students how to present results in a poster format. [7]
  7. To teach students to work in teams. [4]
COURSE OUTCOMES:
for each course outcome, links to the Course Objectives are identified in brackets.
  1. Investigate how to compare the mathematical model of a dynamic system with its experimental performance. [1, 2]
  2. a. Evaluate the performance of heat sinks in mitigating temperature rise of microprocessor chips. Model the performance of heat sinks by developing a heat transfer based model. [1, 2] b. Experimentally measure the frequency response of a microscale cantilever. Understand how nanoscale metrology can be performed using an atomic force microscope and use it to evaluate the integrity of a manufactured memory storage device. Estimate the stiffness of microscale cantilevers by measuring the thermally induced deflections/oscillations of compliant cantilevers. [1, 2] c. Understand ideas related to signal acquisition (sampling theorems etc.) in addition to concepts related to Fourier analysis and power spectral density.
  3. a. Determine the calorific value of transportation fuels using a bomb calorimeter and explore the sources of error and uncertainty in such measurements. Consider how the energy content of fuels and the efficiency of the energy conversion process through either spark ignition or compression ignition engines yields differences in overall vehicle fuel economy. [1, 2] b. Characterize the regimes of boiling heat transfer and perform mathematical analyses of the conduction heat transfer within metal spheres of different materials, when a metal sphere at room temperature is immersed in a pool of liquid nitrogen. [1, 2] c. Determine how welding process parameters such as feed rate and input power influence the heat effected zone for MIG and spot-welding processes. Section and microscopically examine the welded zone. Determine how process parameters influence the strength of the welded joint. [1, 2]
  4. Create a proposal for an experimental program. [3]
  5. Plan and execute an experimental program. [3]
  6. Be able to use a variety of industrial and scientific formats to present the results and conclusions of an experimental project in a clear, readable, succinct, and informative written format [4]
  7. Present a proposal for a project in an oral form. [5]
  8. Present the results of a project in a poster format. [6]
ASSESSMENT TOOLS:
for each assessment tool, links to the course outcomes are identified
  1. Lab reports containing an abstract, results, discussion, conclusions, and figures for each laboratory
  2. Oral reports
  3. Full length report for the final lab project
  4. Examination of lab books to verify correct recording and analysis of data
  5. Self-evaluation by team members
  6. Evaluation of oral presentation(s) by the faculty and GSI's

PREPARED BY: P. Reddy
LAST UPDATED: 02/03/2016