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Ceccio Awarded APS Fellowship

ceccioME and Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Professor Steven Ceccio was made a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) at the annual meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD) held last November in Minnesota.

The fellowship was awarded in recognition of Ceccio's "experimental advancements in multiphase and high-Reynolds number flows, including cavitating flows, gas-solid flows, and skin friction drag reduction using gas and polymer injection." Each year, no more than one-half of one percent of the then current membership of the APS are made fellows in order recognize those who "have made advances in knowledge through original research and publications, or made significant and innovative contributions in the application of physics to science and technology." 

Ceccio also presented an invited talk at the APS-DFD meeting entitled "Cavitation and Bubble Dynamics in Vortical Flows." He presented a summary of several years of research related to the formation, collapse, and resulting noise production of small cavitation bubbles that form in the cores of concentrated liquid vortices.  "Vortex cavitation is often the first type of cavitation that forms around lifting surfaces and within turbomachinery," said Ceccio. "The bubble/vortex interactions are quite complex and interesting, especially since the small bubbles produce a wide variety of acoustic signals." This work was conducted in Ceccio's Cavitation and Multiphase Flow Laboratory. 

Multiphase flow occurs when two or more components are present in a flow.  The components may be chemically distinct, such as air bubbles in water or dust particles in a gas.  Or, they may be different phases of the same substance, such as water vapor and liquid in a boiling flow. "Multiphase flows occur in a wide variety of flow found in nature and in engineered systems," said Ceccio. "Our group is currently working on gas-liquid and polymer-laden flows, cavitating flows, and solid-gas flows."

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