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Ulsoy to Lecture on Intelligent Machines and Smart Products

Professor Galip UlsoyThe Rackham School of Graduate Studies and Office of the Provost announce Professor A. Galip Ulsoy's Distinguished University Professorship Lecture on Monday, March 29 at 4:00 p.m. in the Amphitheatre of the Horace H. Rackham School of Graduate Studies Building. The lecture title is "Intelligent Machines and Smart Products." A reception will follow. It is not necessary to RSVP in advance.

Professor Ulsoy has provided the following abstract of his lecture.

Intelligent machines and smart products (i.e., mechatronic systems embedded with knowledge about the system dynamic behavior) are becoming ubiquitous.  Today, approximately 90% of all computer code resides in such systems, and they are used to address a variety of societal problems (e.g., automotive fuel efficiency, emissions and safety).  Examples described, from past research, include preventing belt failures, drill breakage, and run-off-road accidents.

Current research on an intelligent system for stamping sheet metal parts, and a methodology for designing smart products, are highlighted.  The intelligent stamping system, based on an understanding of the process dynamics, uses an adaptive controller to prevent failures (i.e., tearing, wrinkling and springback), reduce die try-out time, and provide consistent part quality in the presence of process disturbances (i.e., lubrication changes, changes in material formability or thickness). 

Smart product design requires the design of both an artifact, as well as the controller for that artifact.  The combined design, or co-design, of the artifact and controller can lead to improved performance of the smart product, when the two design problems are coupled.  This is demonstrated for design of an active suspension for an automobile.  A quantitative measure of such coupling is presented, and an effective sequential design approach (i.e., design the artifact first, then design its controller) to co-design is proposed, and illustrated for the design of a MEMS actuator.

A. Galip Ulsoy is the C.D. Mote, Jr. Distinguished University Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the William Clay Ford Professor of Manufacturing at University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  He received the Ph.D. from University of California at Berkeley (1979), the M.S. degree from Cornell University (1975), and the B.S. degree from Swarthmore College (1973).  His research interests are in the dynamics and control of mechanical systems.  He has received numerous awards, including the American Automatic Control Council's 1993 O. Hugo Schuck Best Paper Award, the 2003 Rudolf Kalman Best Paper Award from the J. Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control, the 2008 Albert M. Sargent Progress Award from the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), and the 2008 Rufus T. Oldenburger Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and is a Fellow of both the ASME and SME.

For questions, contact Jessica Barr (734-674-8218; barrjess@umich.edu).

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